Jaq Broche

A rare 18ct yellow gold and enamel verge watch by Jaq Broche, Berlin with case signed Huaud Les Deux Freres c.1660

  • A rare 18ct yellow gold and enamel verge watch by Jaq Broche, Berlin with case signed Huaud Les Deux Freres c.1660

Jaq Broche

A rare 18ct yellow gold and enamel verge watch by Jaq Broche, Berlin with case signed Huaud Les Deux Freres c.1660

The white enamel dial features Roman numeral hour indices and outer minute track with 0-60 Arabic scale. The watch is set within a decorative enamel case which depicts the Goddess Minerva resting upon her shield, surrounded by rich silks, with Puttoes at her side. One can be seen brandishing a staff while the other holds a mirror for the Goddess to admire herself. The interior and sides of the case depict country scenes and views of a castle and lake.

Price upon request


This fine and rare enamel cased verge watch is an exquisite example of the prowess of Swiss enameling from the 17th century. Geneva’s unique geographic location and reputation as a safe haven from religious persecution made it a flourishing centre of trade throughout the 17th-19th centuries with high density of talented goldsmiths, watchmakers and enamellists practicing their trade.

The Huaud (or Huaut) family of Geneva are celebrated for their distinct and beautiful style of enameling, particularly their work in miniatures and watch cases. Their outstanding work is characterized by their rich and varied use of bold colours, in contrast to the pastel shades of contemporary French enamellers in Blois. The enamel cases decorated by the Huaud family are regarded as exceptional works of art in their own right, with examples of their work in the collections of major museums around the world including the Met (New York), the Louvre (Paris) and the V&A (London).

Jean-Pierre Huaud entered a partnership with his brother Ami in 1682, when the brothers moved to Berlin in an attempt to find the support and patronage for their luxury items. In 1686 they were joined by their brother Pierre II, who helped them obtain appointments as enamel painters to Friedrich Wilhelm III (1657-1713) who would become the Duke of Prussia and Elector of Brandenburg, a position they held until their return to Geneva in 1700. The brothers continued working together until the death of Jean-Pierre in 1723 and Ami a year later.

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The white enamel dial features Roman numeral hour indices and outer minute track with 0-60 Arabic scale. The watch is set within a decorative enamel case which depicts the Goddess Minerva resting upon her shield, surrounded by rich silks, with Puttoes at her side. One can be seen brandishing a staff while the other holds a mirror for the Goddess to admire herself. The interior and sides of the case depict country scenes and views of a castle and lake.

Price upon request


This fine and rare enamel cased verge watch is an exquisite example of the prowess of Swiss enameling from the 17th century. Geneva’s unique geographic location and reputation as a safe haven from religious persecution made it a flourishing centre of trade throughout the 17th-19th centuries with high density of talented goldsmiths, watchmakers and enamellists practicing their trade.

The Huaud (or Huaut) family of Geneva are celebrated for their distinct and beautiful style of enameling, particularly their work in miniatures and watch cases. Their outstanding work is characterized by their rich and varied use of bold colours, in contrast to the pastel shades of contemporary French enamellers in Blois. The enamel cases decorated by the Huaud family are regarded as exceptional works of art in their own right, with examples of their work in the collections of major museums around the world including the Met (New York), the Louvre (Paris) and the V&A (London).

Jean-Pierre Huaud entered a partnership with his brother Ami in 1682, when the brothers moved to Berlin in an attempt to find the support and patronage for their luxury items. In 1686 they were joined by their brother Pierre II, who helped them obtain appointments as enamel painters to Friedrich Wilhelm III (1657-1713) who would become the Duke of Prussia and Elector of Brandenburg, a position they held until their return to Geneva in 1700. The brothers continued working together until the death of Jean-Pierre in 1723 and Ami a year later.